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irene which do cause some minor flooding in this area. they're concerned this could cause major flooding. there was a study out of columbia university that said had hurricane irene been one foot worse it could have caused an additional $50 billion in damage. the fear here is that if the water comes up over this seawall, which is right here next to me, it could flood the subway tunnels, even the electrical grid here. mayor michael bloomberg said he's considering shutting down two electrical networks in lower manhattan. that would shut down power to some 17,000 people but it could quickly get much, much higher than that. as the day continues we're expecting this storm surge to grow. high tide is about 8:50 tonight. there's a full moon so it's an even higher tide than usual. if that storm surge of six to eleven feet hits right at that bad moment, that is what concerns them most, soledad. >> of course, john, it's cold! usually when we cover these hurricanes it's much warmer. but if they lose power, as many people are predicting, 10 million people up along the east coast could lose power, you
before hurricane irene, chris christie told people in no uncertain terms and i will quote him here, get the hell outfit beach. my question to you, are people heeding his message to get out and get to safer ground? >> reporter: you know, they are. and you may remember, he caught some criticism for using those strong words last year after what people along the immediate jersey shore felt was an overreaction. certainly after irene's disaster, turned out to be a wise choice, especially for those living along the immediately shoreline. here in asbury park and up and down the northern coastline of new jersey, they have certainly heeded his warning. here's a look at the surf that continues to pour in. the tide is actually receding now. but i've only seen it go down maybe five, ten feet in the last 20 minutes because the actual surge continues to push water over what should be dry, sandy beach here. but obviously that's not the case. so i think throughout the afternoon, even though the tide is going down, we're going to see it hold where it is. and when high tide comes again later on tonight ar
hurricane irene, we achieved a 98% evacuation rate. but for whatever reason, this time, we haven't reached that number yet. we think we're somewhere having evacuated several thousand people. but we still have too many people in atlantic city. that creates a very uncomfortable situation for all of our emergency responders and officials are still trying to do the best we can to get people out of harm's way. >> mayor, ali velshi is on the streets of atlantic city. right now, the winds are obviously very gusty. ali, you have a question you'd like to ask the mayor. >> reporter: yes, i do, mayor. and the important thing is by looking at atlantic city, people can look at this and say, this might happen in my community. if you're still not evacuated, what do you do? i know people are driving around. they can get out in their car but it's gusty and dangerous. should people leave and go to a shelter now or hunker down and stay? >> at this point, i think they would be best served to stay at home and hunker down. i just visited a couple of our shelters. i had a very difficult time getting back to wher
to be evacuations like we saw with irene. we have evacuations for fire island, though. a low-lying barrier island on the south shore of long island. and you know, you can't take this seriously enough. storm surge is very dangerous. flooding is the leading killer in any kind of hurricanes. this is no ordinary hurricane. this one is a big event. we'll be talking about it throughout the morning. brooke? >> appreciate it. bonnie mentioned north carolina. let's go straight to the coastal area. outer banks, kill devil hills. george howl is standing by for us in an area already very much so apparently getting hit by this hurricane. and george, as i wait to see your picture, i -- here you are, is the rain coming down? >> reporter: yeah, brooke. the rain definitely coming in. it's that sideways rain. combined with sand, helping to -- a good indication that the storm is getting much closer to us. we're in an area, the northwestern quadrant of the storm. that is where you see the storm bringing in bands of heavy rain. these bands of winds that are coming in. in fact, that band right now stretches from wilmi
. at the peak of irene. we're dealing with a history making storm. let's take a look at the center. we expect the center to make its way on shore in the next hour or so. so landfall perhaps within the hour. bring you the latest. there is the latest track again. moving west/northwest at 28 miles per hour. again, we think south jersey, around cape may, but we are getting reports that atlantic city is under water. wind gusts again, as we head throughout the evening. wind gusts in excess of 100 miles per hour. hurricane force winds extending 120 miles away from the center of the storm. we're going to feel this up and down the coastline, the worst of storm surge, wind and rain north of where the center makes landfall. kimberly? >> kimberly: thank you. we'll check back with you later in the program. it may hit landfall in this program. let's go to rick leventhal, live in point pleasant, new jersey, where we have seen the conditions deteriorating by the hour. rick? >> we moved off the beach. it was too nasty out there. we moved to the hotel one block from the beach. where the power is now coming on
. just a year ago we had the irene experience. fairly significant amount of time from time to time. people are used to weather events. not used to hurricanes but a weather event nonetheless and it's here, dangerous, and people are taking it seriously. the public is taking it seriously. the citizens of the city have heeded the warnings. we've gotten through some of the toughest part of this. we'll still get hit tonight and overnight with the actual storm, high wind that will weaken trees. we have 90 to 100 trees down. 400 thousand people without power in the region and our energy company will do a fantastic job getting those people back on. on the one hand, you hope for the best, prepare for the worst. we have a great professional team making sure philadelphiaens are safe. >> sounds like first responders all over the northeast should get a big shout out. they've done an amazing job. >> absolutely. >> mr. mayor, thank you for joining me. >> piers, thank you. bye-bye. >> coming up next, storm chaser taking on super storm sandy. [ male announcer ] citi turns 200 this year. in that time
and down the shore. >> it is just like nothing i have ever seen before. you know, we had irene. last year we had a nor'easter in '92. i remember as a kid hurricane donna but nothing like this. there are so many people stranded without shelter. and the damage to the public infrastructure, to the boardwalks, municipal buildings, firehouses it is just endless. bill: frank pallone, thank you. we're going to stay in touch with you and a lot of others down there and hopefully get the word out. if we can help in any way making the word more public we certainly will, sir. thank you and good luck to you and your family. >> thank you. bill: frank pallone, democrat on the jersey shore. waking up to a whole new world as so many people are. >> sandy's wrath is extending into west virgina. have you seen the snow that got dumped on west virgina. look at this scene. blizzard conditions there. up to three feet of snow in some parts of the state. we're live there on the ground now. we're going to tell you what is going on. bill: while we continue to deal with that storm damage we can not forget this. you'r
you compare this to other events you've seen? >> let's see. katrina -- or irene last year this area also flooded. but not nearly as bad as this. the clean up, it's pretty much drained within a day or so. and lost no electricity last year. this one we were -- you know, we don't know the epa. >> reporter: dan, thanks very much. good luck to you. wolf, there's one resident, one business owner here determine today recover. others here have an amazing sense of community spirit. these are all community volunteers doing all this work largely responsible for the clearing of the streets. as i mentioned, just a couple hours ago this water was up to my knees, up to the knees of these volunteers who waded out here in some very, very unhealthy and almost dangerous water because it has so much sewage and chemicals and garbage in it. >> brian, we'll get back to you in hoboken, new jersey. let's head back to manhattan. we've re-established our contact with dr. sanjay gupta. he's at bellevue hospital, sanjay, 700 patients now need to be evacuated because they've lost power, emergency generators at b
, connecticut, long island, new jersey, than irene did last year. this could be a big storm as it makes that turn and slams directly into where new york and new jersey come together, the water could really pile up in here. maybe that problem we thought about last time where water's in the subway, if it gets to be right in new york harbor, we're talking about that scenario potential again. >> chad, we'll keep watching. thanks. >>> a lot more we're following. isha is here with the bulletin. >>> a late breaking story. here is what john sununu said moments ago on "piers morgan tonight." >> when you look at coll inch p -- colin powell, you have to look at whether this is the issues or a slightly different reason for endorsing the president. >> what would that be? >> well, if you are proud of someone of your own race being president, applaud colin for doing so. >>> there wasn't enough real time information to determine exactly what was happening in benghazi, libya last month. four americans were killed in the assault. >>> business news now, apple says profits jumped 24% last quarter, driven b
, irene didn't do too much to new york city. but it certainly did a lot to vermont. and will this storm do something similar as it's stalling. here all the models bringing it up from the city down to about washington, d.c. but the big thing is it stops, it stops moving for 48 hours and it could rain for two days and make flooding. if it rains a half an inch an hour for 48 hours, that's two feet of rain in any one spot. that is going to cause significant flash flooding and the potential for big loss of life. >> chad, thanks for the update. we may well come back to you before the end of the show. appreciate it. >>> let's get back to politics and the subject of race. outspoken conservative ann coulter has a lot to say about just about everything, in fact. the new subject of her new book is "mugged, racial demagoguery" dedicated to quote, the freest black man in america. we'll discover who that is. ann coulter, welcome back. >> thank you. good to be here. >> i know you have been struggling with a bit of a cold. >> you have an unfair advantage about it tonight. >> you have been whining about it
a memory of irene last year. we saw the flooding from a tropical storm near new york city. shows you the size and scope of storms and how they can affect states far from the coasts. the wind gusts now are strong. kill devil hills, well over tropical storm-force winds. we're seeing them over 40 miles per hour in virginia beach. just the beginning. the winds tonight and tomorrow are going to pick up enormously. gusts will be hurricane force all the way across boston, through new york city through philadelphia. 80 mile-per-hour gusts. these -- these are the type of gusts that will knock down trees and cause major power outages. notice, the wind advisories extend into ohio and pennsylvania, as well. want to mention this time of year, october, this is when weast beautiful -- we have the beautiful changing of the leave colors, trees are heavy with the leaves. when they fall, they will fall hard. this is a heavy puncher. we have rain tuesday, then beyond that, wednesday into thursday with the storm. some of the heaviest rain in the mid-atlantic coming in steadily and staying there. that's w
with katrina and irene and so on, you look to see how individual governors and states and indeed, the federal level, have coped with this. from what you're seeing, what you're hearing and picking up, are you impressed with the preparation? are you concerned still? >> i mean, this is the first disaster i've gone through in new york city and i mean, just as a resident of the city, it seems pretty well run. i think there's always going to be things that happen and you just can't keep the ocean out of your city if the ocean's determined to get in. >> i think mayor bloomberg has been spot-on, actually. he's done a series of press conferences. he seems to be completely on top of the brief. he's prepared everybody. there's always going to be, i can't believe this, still idiots who are out there today jogging next to the water. why would you be so stupid? listen to what the mayors, the governors, president, everyone is telling you, get inside and be safe. >> i think curiosity is an incredibly powerful force. we can watch the news on tv but sometimes it's right down the street and it's very hard not t
people, customers, without power in new jersey now as after hurricane irene a year ago and gives you a sense of the depth of the problem here. 60% of the state does not have power. and again, it's going to take a while. yes, there is some frustration but i think people are understanding that this is a really severe calamity that hit this place and you can see along the jersey shore places like this, a beach front property, a restaurant obliterated and what president obama and governor christie are seeing as they fly up and down the shoreline. we saw marine one go by in a convoy with helicopters about ten minutes ago and making their rounds. but i don't think a lot of people expect a lot from the federal government in the short term. >> yeah. >> right now people are just trying to deal with their immediate needs, moving in with neighbors, staying with friends. we have heard reports that some utility companies are talking about perhaps turning off water services, for example, because there could be contamination in the system. people are hunkering down and the work is just beginning. i
that to the list of things to do. >> i am being serious. this is very much like irene a couple of years ago but worse than that . we'll be dealing with a hybrid storm and super storm that emerges with a cold tront and hurricane inside of a nor'easter. if that sounds scary, you need to be prepared for the storm. it could be potentially devastating. millions of people will be affected by still a hurricane. we will see tropical storm force win and rain all across the coast of florida and extending 300 miles from the storm.this storm will get bigger. it hugs the coast over the weekend and tuesday, dc, philly and new york. you could see a storm packing winds of 60 or 80 miles per hour for hours and hours . storm surge as well with high tide. this being be an event that we have not seen in our lifetime. gretchen, you need to understand your evacuation route this weekend. >> gretchen: i will be calling up jd, help me find my evacuation route. >> i will help you. >> brian: we'll show up at your door. >> you, too, brian. you live close to the coast. >> brian: one anchor ahead. >> steve: can't yell a
in white plains, where literally trees are ripped from its roots. >> amazing stuff. first, irene, now sandy. for two consecutive years, costly deadly hurricanes hit the northeast. we're hear a lot of people say if irene was a wake-up call, sandy is a bucket of water that should snap us all to attention. let's listen to andrew cuomo, the governor of new york. >> there has been a series of extreme weather incidents. anyone that is not a political statement, that is not a factual statement. anyone who says there is not a dramatic change in weather patterns, i think is denying reality. and i would like to say that this is probably the last occurrence we will have. i don't believe that. >> cuomo went on to say new york now seems to get a 100 year flood every two years. joining me now is ben strauss, the chief operating officer and director of the program on sea level rise at climate central. is this a sign of things to come? governor cuomo is saying we seem to be getting 100-year storm every two years. >> this was actually -- since 1900, three of the top ten highest flood levels have occurred in
, would be more dangerous than even irene from last year. it turned out to be a huge flood problem for virginia, vermont and new jersey. i know it's late in the season, but the water is still warm enough to make this storm generate. it went -- i was watch it last night in bed on my -- i was tweeting from 8:00 until 12:00, and this thing went from an 80-mile-per-hour storm to about a 115 as it left jamaica and slammed into cuba, and that was only in five hours. there's a lot of potential. >> is it true that a late storm as well could be a lot deadlier, a lot more dangerous late in the season? >> i would say an earlier storm, october 10th, that peak day with the waters the warmest would be the most concerning, but i think people probably take it less serious. oh, come on, it's november. it can't happen. there's not going to be anything bad. if you let your guard down and think that it's out of season, you're wrong. look at the waves there. is that miami? somewhere. look at that. the way it's crashing on. that's why you can't even be on the sea wall. you need to be behind it and in th
irene of last year. >> okay. we'll talk about it for a little while. thank you very much. >>> now back to politics. forget ohio and florida for a second here. the campaigns turning to virginia which president obama turned blue last go around but this time there are cracks in his support. john king talks with voters on the ground amid a dead heat in the polls. rees all laugh when you walk by ♪ ♪ and the neighbors' kids... what does being true to yourself have to do with being healthy? everything. ♪ but you're not ♪ you're the one ♪ one, one, one, one, one ♪ the one ♪ one, one, one, one, one ♪ the one ♪ one, one, one... email marketing from constant contact reaches people in a place they're checking every day -- their inbox. and it gives you the tools to create custom emails that drive business. it's just one of the ways constant contact can help you grow your small business. sign up for your free trial today at constantcontact.com/try. >>> virginia will be inundated with presidential campaign stops really between now and sunday. president obama and paul ryan today. joe
Search Results 0 to 30 of about 31 (some duplicates have been removed)

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